Why are school buses so high off the ground?

School bus seats are higher off the ground so that most opposing vehicles are below the kids’ feet. The four-inch cushioned seats and high seat backs create a compartment for students in the event of an accident. Seats are closer together than in most vehicles, creating even more of a safe zone.

Why are buses so tall?

They have to provide enough height for standing passengers, which puts the ceiling at about 2.5 m above the road. For technical reasons the floor is higher towards the back of the bus where the motor and transmission are, and if standing height should be provided there too, the ceiling is a little higher even.

Are school buses safer than cars?

Overview. The school bus is the safest vehicle on the road—your child is much safer taking a bus to and from school than traveling by car. Although four to six school-age children die each year on school transportation vehicles, that’s less than one percent of all traffic fatalities nationwide.

How tall are bus steps?

Get it sent to your inbox . Specifications for the school buses have for many years required 16-inch-high steps. Regular city buses are required by law to have bottom steps no more than 17 inches off the ground, but most are in fact no more than 12 inches.

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Why should there be seatbelts on school buses?

Combination lap and shoulder belts would require stiffer seats, which could increase injury to students who are not buckled up. The driver cannot ensure that every child has their seat belt on; some buses can carry up to 70 children. … In an emergency, seatbelts could hinder evacuation.

Do seat belts make school buses safer?

The NTSB notes that despite school buses being “extremely safe,” they are susceptible to rollover crashes, like the one in Ohio. … To date, only eight states – California, Florida, Louisiana, Nevada, New Jersey, New York and Texas – require seat belts on school buses.

Why are all school buses yellow?

The yellow-orange color was selected because black lettering on it was most legible in semi-darkness, and because it was conspicuous at a distance and unusual enough to become associated with school buses and groups of children en route.

Life on wheels